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NOAA’s Arctic Research Program provides environmental intelligence that forms the foundation for understanding the complex Arctic system to support effective stewardship, resilient communities and economies. 

Photo: NOAA

Latest Features //

Sailing drone captures dawn while crossing the Bering Strait

Sailing drone captures dawn while crossing the Bering Strait

In the early hours of August 1 bound for a voyage of data collection, one of two remotely operated unmanned sailing vehicles snapped this dreamy dawn photo as it sailed through the choppy Bering Strait. In the distance are the islands of Little Diomede in the United States and Big Diomede in Russia.
August 8, 2017 0 Comments
Arctic Saildrone

Arctic Saildrone

The Arctic Saildrone is a wind-powered, unmanned surface water vehicle able to reach remote and harsh environments in the Arctic to collect important atmospheric and oceanic data.
July 26, 2017 0 Comments
International Arctic Buoy Programme

International Arctic Buoy Programme

The International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) is a joint effort between multiple international agencies to deploy and maintain Arctic buoys in the Pacific Arctic region for the purpose of collecting oceanic and meteorological data. Primarily supported by ARP for the US section, IABP also receives support from other private and public agencies in other Arctic nations....
July 26, 2017 0 Comments
United States Arctic Observing Network

United States Arctic Observing Network

The United States Arctic Observing Network (U.S. AON) is an initiative to promote sustained and well-defined networks of Arctic observations through collaborative development across U.S. Federal agencies and other partners.
July 26, 2017 0 Comments
Distributed Biological Observatory

Distributed Biological Observatory

The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) is a multidisciplinary Arctic ocean sampling program supported by the NOAA’s Arctic Research Program. ARP supports an annual scientific cruise to the Pacific Arctic region during which U.S. scientists take a wide range of physical, chemical, and...
July 26, 2017 0 Comments

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About Our Arctic Work //

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) provides the research foundation for understanding the complex Arctic system, including the complicated linkages among melting sea ice, changing climate, ecosystems and weather patterns in the Arctic and around the globe. Through increased scientific understanding and improved service delivery of predictions and forecasts, OAR supports the critical missions of the other NOAA lines offices as well as focuses on issues related to national security concerns through the collection of environmental intelligence. OAR is committed to effective stewardship and management of coastal and ocean resources and supporting resilient and vibrant Arctic communities and economies.

Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Home //

Focus Areas //

Arctic Report Card

Tracking recent environmental changes relative to historical records

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Oceans

Conserving and managing our Arctic Ocean resources

Weather

Providing weather information to protect lives, property, and management

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Satellites

Observing the Arctic ocean and atmosphere to understand and forecast Arctic change

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Research

Providing environmental intelligence to understanding the complex Arctic system

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Fisheries

Conserving and managing Arctic living marine resources and their habitats

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Our Scientists, Experts, and Partners //

Craig McLean

Craig McLean

Assistant Administrator, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
December 12, 2016 0 Comments
Dr. W. Russell Callender

Dr. W. Russell Callender

Assistant Administrator, National Ocean Service
December 12, 2016 0 Comments
Eileen Sobeck

Eileen Sobeck

Assistant Administrator, National Marine Fisheries Service

December 8, 2016 0 Comments
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