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Global - Global Temperature Trends: 2013 Summation

Global Temperatures | City Temperatures | Ocean Overturning

NASA scientists say 2013 tied with 2009 and 2006 for the seventh warmest year since 1880, continuing a long-term trend of rising global temperatures. With the exception of 1998, the 10 warmest years in the 134-year record all have occurred since 2000, with 2010 and 2005 ranking as the warmest years on record. NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) analyzes global surface temperatures on an ongoing basis. The analysis of 2013 data shows how Earth continues to experience temperatures warmer than those measured several decades ago.

(NASA Press Release, 1/21/2014).


2013 Global Temps from NASA and NOAA

2013 annual mean global surface temperature anomaly (deviation from base period). Credit: NASA GISS, From NASA/NOAA Press Materials website.

2013 annual mean land and ocean temperature anomalies (deviations from base period). Credit NOAA NCDC. From NASA/NOAA Press Materials website.

According to the GISS analysis:

The average temperature in 2013 was 58.3 degrees Fahrenheit (14.6 Celsius), which is 1.1 F (0.6 C) warmer than the mid-20th century baseline. The average global temperature has risen about 1.4 degrees F (0.8 C) since 1880, according to the new analysis. Exact rankings for individual years are sensitive to data inputs and analysis methods.

"Long-term trends in surface temperatures are unusual and 2013 adds to the evidence for ongoing climate change," GISS climatologist Gavin Schmidt said. "While one year or one season can be affected by random weather events, this analysis shows the necessity for continued, long-term monitoring."

Scientists emphasize that weather patterns always will cause fluctuations in average temperatures from year to year, but the continued increases in greenhouse gas levels in Earth's atmosphere are driving a long-term rise in global temperatures.

Read the complete analysis and discussion from the NASA Research News: NASA Finds 2013 Sustained Long-Term Climate Warming Trend (January 21, 2014).

Also see "Five-year global temperature Anomalies from 1880-2013" including animation materials and frames (NASA GSFC) and NOAA's Global Analysis for 2013.

Find more information (references and websites)