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Global - Global Temperature Trends: 2014 Summation

Global Temperatures | City Temperatures | Ocean Overturning

NASA and NOAA scientists say the year 2014 ranks as Earth’s warmest since 1880, according to two separate analyses by NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists. The 10 warmest years in the instrumental record, with the exception of 1998, have now occurred since 2000. This trend continues a long-term warming of the planet, according to an analysis of surface temperature measurements by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute of Space Studies (GISS) in New York.

(NASA Press Release, 1/16/2015).


2014 global temperature anomaly

1950-2014 temperature trend

Maps of the 2014 global temperature anomaly (left) and the 1950-2014 temperature trend right)
(Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Earth Observatory, NASA/GISS)
spc

According to the Press Release:

Since 1880, Earth’s average surface temperature has warmed by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius), a trend that is largely driven by the increase in carbon dioxide and other human emissions into the planet’s atmosphere. The majority of that warming has occurred in the past three decades.

"This is the latest in a series of warm years, in a series of warm decades. While the ranking of individual years can be affected by chaotic weather patterns, the long-term trends are attributable to drivers of climate change that right now are dominated by human emissions of greenhouse gases," said GISS Director Gavin Schmidt.

While 2014 temperatures continue the planet’s long-term warming trend, scientists still expect to see year-to-year fluctuations in average global temperature caused by phenomena such as El Niño or La Niña. These phenomena warm or cool the tropical Pacific and are thought to have played a role in the flattening of the long-term warming trend over the past 15 years. However, 2014’s record warmth occurred during an El Niño-neutral year.

Read the complete analysis and discussion from the NASA Research News:
NASA, NOAA Find 2014 Warmest Year in Modern Record
(January 16, 2015).

NASA Earth Observatory has posted a somewhat different temperature summation at:
earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=85083

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center's summary is at:
www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/summary-info/global/2014/12

Find more information (references and websites)